[Press Release] Norrecco, Isover and Leca

 [Press Release] Norrecco, Isover and Leca

 

 

Excess glass wool from renovations and new construction projects is currently being deposited in landfills. This is an issue that has been addressed for several years in order to find new solutions as part of the circular agenda. Therefore, Isover and Leca, both owned by Saint-Gobain, have now entered into an agreement with Norrecco, one of Denmark's largest waste management companies. The agreement between the three companies means that Norrecco now receives and forwards used Isover glass wool to Leca Denmark AS. This means that the glass wool can be used as a raw material in the circular production of new insulating Leca® LWA at Leca's factory in Hinge near Randers.

With the new system, Norrecco and Saint-Gobain have created a model that allows contractors to return used and excess Isover glass wool at one of Norrecco's waste treatment stations at Prøvestenen in Copenhagen and in Agerskov, Southern Jutland. Norrecco then ensures that the returned glass wool becomes part of Leca's production of new Leca® LWA, which is used for insulation purposes ranging from green roofs to ground slabs and stormwater solutions with drainage, as they can absorb and release water. Leca® LWA is a fully circular product that can be used again and again.

Similar models for other waste streams

"We need to recycle much more construction waste than is currently the case. To achieve good and robust recycling solutions, it often requires specially designed models for each material type. Now, we have succeeded in establishing a recycling solution for clean glass wool. We hope that this will increase the industry's focus on collaboration for similar models for other types of construction waste," says Jette Bjerre Hansen, Sustainability Manager at Norrecco.

Preserving the Earth's natural resources

According to Mona Ammitzbøll Rasmussen, Sustainability Engineer at Saint-Gobain Denmark, the new return system for the company's glass wool is an important step towards embracing more recycling and reducing the amount of materials sent to landfills.

"From the moment our glass wool leaves the factory, we want to support the idea that the material will one day return and be used in the production of new insulation materials, rather than ending up in landfills. It is an unnecessary waste that we need to eliminate as soon as possible," explains Mona Ammitzbøll Rasmussen.

Leca Denmark AS has the capacity to annually accept approximately 1,000 tons of used or excess Isover glass wool from the Danish market. Although it represents a small portion of the total production, it reduces the need to extract a corresponding amount of natural clay, which is the primary raw material in Leca® LWA.

Improved source separation

Isover glass wool has the potential for much greater recycling, and this is the first of several initiatives where collaboration among stakeholders in the value chain is crucial for increased recycling.

The foundation for all recycling efforts is a strong focus on source separation. Craftsmen and contractors will play a crucial role in ensuring proper sorting of materials. Within the insulation industry, one of the challenges, according to Mona Ammitzbøll Rasmussen, is differentiating between the various types of mineral wool and assessing their purity. Therefore, Isover is working on guides to assist with better source separation.

"It's a new reality where it makes sense to demand a little extra time for waste management and develop smart solutions for source separation. But the responsibility does not solely lie with the craftsmen. We also need builders and authorities to become more involved in setting requirements and allocating time and resources in projects for the circular economy we aim to build together," concludes Mona Ammitzbøll Rasmussen.

 

For further information and interviews:

Morten Starup, Communications Manager, Saint-Gobain Denmark.

Phone: +45 4212 7581. Email: morten.starup@saint-gobain.com

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